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Author Topic: Oh. My. Gods.  (Read 12289 times)

BDR

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2007, 10:53 »

Only played the first one, but I'd think if Kratos wasn't capable of love after his wife and kid died, Ares would have needed to use something else to try and break him near the end.  Now, whether Kratos is capable of loving anyone else anymore is a horse of a different color, but I'm pretty sure that the only people who are incapable of learning to love someone else (who is worth loving, obviously) haven't learned to love anybody at all.  Because I've only played the first one, though, I'm not qualified to even speculate on the first two questions.
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RickVoid

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2007, 11:04 »

Only played the first one, but I'd think if Kratos wasn't capable of love after his wife and kid died, Ares would have needed to use something else to try and break him near the end.  Now, whether Kratos is capable of loving anyone else anymore is a horse of a different color, but I'm pretty sure that the only people who are incapable of learning to love someone else (who is worth loving, obviously) haven't learned to love anybody at all.  Because I've only played the first one, though, I'm not qualified to even speculate on the first two questions.

Actually, there is a bit in the first game that leads me to think that Athena may love him. For example, as your boat pulls into Athens, Kratos talks to her. She promises him the the Gods will forgive his crimes. He assumes this means he'll be able to forgive himself. She knows that's what he thinks, but she doesn't correct him. Why? Multiple reasons:
1) As a
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Kratos is the only one powerful enough to stop Ares from destroying Greece, because the other Gods can't take any action against him without tearing Olympus apart. And 2) My theory, she knows that Kratos has to fight Ares in order to redeem himself, or he'll have nothing to live for, and never take his place with her on Olympus. After he defeats Ares, and discovers that he still is unable to forgive himself, and feels that the gods have abondoned him, he throws himself to his death. But Athena saves him, replaces his lost blades with a pair of her own, and grants him full Godhood as the new God of War.

Why? What does she gain by having Kratos on Olympus?
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BDR

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2007, 11:13 »

Hum.  I dunno, I took it at face value (it's not the gods' business to correct the heroic mortal's mistaken assumptions/beliefs, and killing Ares left a void that necessarily had to be filled, though now that I think about it why he wasn't approached immediately after killing Ares is a bit of a puzzler when taking it like this [unless the gods figured he'd know all this, or do it anyway because he'd want to be a god himself, or whatever]).  It'd be different, I suppose, if she weren't communicating mostly through emotionless statues and had more visible signs of love, but she's not, and she doesn't manage that anyway as far as I could see, and it wasn't like they had too many tender moments anyway, so it never crossed my mind.
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RickVoid

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2007, 11:22 »

GOW II give us some more reasons to think this, but I promised I wouldn't post any of those here... yet.

However, I thought it was interesting that, after Ares strips Kraots of the Blades of Chaos (and I could write pages about the symbolism of those chains), Athena replaces them with a set of golden chain blades that bear her name. When he had Ares, it seemed to me that he bore them as a sign of his slavery to Ares. Like the chains branded to his arms, he can't get away from it. What on earth could have possesed Athena to offer him something so similar to the symbol of his servitude?

And a better question: Why did Kratos accept them and, indeed, revel in using them? :)
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BDR

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2007, 11:33 »

[first part removed and second bit altered due to lack of initial comprehension]

I'm not sure why Athena offered him something like that, but I do have an idea why Kratos might have accepted them; Athena's the goddess of justice/wisdom and by accepting a symbol of servitude from her, it would be a symbol of his triumph over Ares, the mad god that loved war so much he forced Kratos to kill those he loved, and of his change to serving justice (for his fallen wife and child, if nothing else) by killing Ares.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2007, 11:58 by BDR »
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cnsvnc

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #20 on: April 30, 2007, 11:46 »

I haven't played either games, but what I remember from mythology is that Athena despises Ares. Their mythological roles are in opposition: Ares is the god of battle, violence, carnage and all around destruction on the battlefield. He's a mass slaughterer. Athena's portfolio includes tactics, strategy, planning and so on; mental side of war. Athena is an intellectual.

She'd love to remove Ares from the pantheon (and all that he stands for from the world) for good.

There could be some sort of metaphor in Kratos' ridding himself of Ares' chains and embracing Athena's weapons.


I REALLY wish GoW is ported to PC though.
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RickVoid

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Re: Oh. My. Gods.
« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2007, 15:16 »

[first part removed and second bit altered due to lack of initial comprehension]

I'm not sure why Athena offered him something like that, but I do have an idea why Kratos might have accepted them; Athena's the goddess of justice/wisdom and by accepting a symbol of servitude from her, it would be a symbol of his triumph over Ares, the mad god that loved war so much he forced Kratos to kill those he loved, and of his change to serving justice (for his fallen wife and child, if nothing else) by killing Ares.
Ah, but he is not in her service, he's a god himself now. He neither serves nor answers to her anymore. So why would he accept them?

Yes, it is a leading question. :)
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